Visiting, Shopping and the Spa: our last relaxing days in Ethiopia

In February 2014, we took our daughters back to Ethiopia for the first time, since their adoption in 2009. This is one of many blog posts we have written about our family’s homeland trip. I also go to Ethiopia every year with our charity, Vulnerable Children Society, so there are additional blogposts from all my trips to Ethiopia to enjoy!

After five eventful days in the sun at Lake Langano, we were ready to head back to the capital. We still had a few things to do… Visit friends, visit the folks who run the orphanage the girls lived in, go to the spa and spend the girls’ saved allowance on Ethiopian toys.

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It was a peaceful ride back from Langano, but a long one.

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First, we stopped in at the orphanage where the girls lived for the better part of a year. It’s a different building than then, but the folks who run it, Selam and Wondu, are the same. We’ve visited and kept in touch over the years, but it was the first time we had visited them with the girls. Wondu was delighted to see them. I thought it was so interesting… He’s the only person in Ethiopia who asked about their personalities, their likes and dislikes. Most people, after seeing the girls and knowing they are ok, well… That’s enough for them. But he was genuinely interested. Selam was on her way back from Addis that day, so we met up with her for a brief visit at a truckstop. She was amazed to see them in person… They were such puny pants when she saw them last in Addis.

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Then we stopped in at my friend Menbere’s family’s house. I’m not sure how many times I’ve been there… Maybe four? But anyway, it feels like visited extended family. The girls quickly grabbed their friend N’s cousin, and they played coffee ceremony on the floor and outside, while the real thing was brewed in the living room. It’s was sweet to see Menbere’s sister teaching her daughter about coffee ceremony. Apparently now that’s she old enough to be going to university, (she was just home on spring break,) she’s old enough to take over coffee ceremony duties. Or at least, be schooled by her momma.

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I should also mention that Amaye’s house is my favourite locale for Ethiopian food, in all of Ethiopia! Seriously, Menbi is such a good cook, but here sister might even be better. I’ve eaten in countless Ethiopian restaurants, and she always has them beat. And just for me, they make countless fasting dishes… Let’s just say we all arrived with empty stomachs, and let groaning and and happy!

We had a quiet night at our guest house in Addis, and then our last day in Ethiopia were spent doing the last thing on the girls’ “to do” list: going to the spa!

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I can’t even express how excited the girls were… This was their number one thing to do in Ethiopia. You see, they’ve been seeing pictures of mommy going after each Ethiopian trip, and it’s something we could never afford at home. So we had a gorgeously relaxing day at Boston Day Spa… I mean, look at this kid’s face!

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They were treated like little little princesses! They didn’t have flip flops small enough for their feet after the pedicure, so the ladies carried them bodily over to the manicure table. So sweet!

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The girls had saved their allowance for weeks to spend in Ethiopia, and our last stop before the plane was… You guessed it… The toy store. Yes, my kids go to Ethiopia, and return with more stuffies. Do judge.. They have an addiction.

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And then that night, we left Ethiopia. It took a few days to get home, with three cancelled flights, but we returned happy and healthy. Well, happy, anyway! Lol

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On the discussion board I belong to, a popular topic is “what age should I take my kids back to Their birth country?” Well, my answer is this: as soon as you can financially swing it. I’ll be back in the fall, but id can’t wait to bring the whole family again. Especially our two little Habeshas.

Stay tuned for my tips on successful homeland travel!

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